Rifles Reenactment

Zouave US Model 1863 Reenactment

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Originally produced by Remington Arms Company in Ilion, NY by contract with the US Government, the Zouave rifle had both strength and fine finish of barrel and mechanism. Though intended for the US Artillery Department, the Zouave 1863 was never distributed to any Civil War army division.  It’s fine features were subsequently discovered by shooters and collectors during the Civil War Centennial and highly sought thereafter.

The 1863 Zouave features brass furniture, ramrod with tulip tip, and three leaf rear sight. There are sling swivels, one under the front band while the other is placed in front of the trigger guard. The lock shows the Eagle stamp and US letters in front of the hammer.

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Mississippi US Model 1841 Reenactment

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The Mississippi US Model 1841 was considered the best looking ordnance long gun of the period. Manufactured at Harpers Ferry from 1846 to 1855, the Model 1841 originally came in 54 caliber, though many were later modified to 58 caliber. It was the first US military weapon made with percussion lock and no provision for a bayonet.

An additional 75,000 muskets were produced by well-known companies such as Remington, Robbins & Lawrence, and Eli Whitney under government contract. Additional units were produced in limited numbers by Tryon in Philidelphia and Palmetto Armory in South Carolina. The 1841 was used by both North and South during the Civil War, and the nickname “Mississippi Rifle” comes from its use to equip a regiment in Mississippi during the war with Mexico in 1848.

The Model US 1841 features polished brass furniture, browned 33” barrel with notched rear sight, case hardened lock and ramrod with brass tip. The lock is nicely marked with the Eagle stamp and “US” in front of the hammer.

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Enfield Musketoon Reenactment

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Originally produced by Enfield for the artillery corps, the Musketoon was extremely handy due to its short barrel length. The barrel is fit to the stock by way of two steel bands, and is equipped with a straight rear sight with slider assembled on a stepped base. Other fixtures are produced from brass. The ramrod tip carries the characteristic jag-slot of its time. The Enfield Musketoon is equipped with two sling swivels and a hook ring in front of the trigger guard. The stock is made of walnut.

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Richmond 1862, Type III Reenactment

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The Richmond 1862 Type III was produced using machines and equipment transferred from the Harpers Ferry arsenal, which was closed on April 18, 1861, to Richmond, the Confederate Capital. At that time, the Richmond State Armory was founded to replace Virginia Manufactory Arms. One of the most popular during the Civil War, it was manufactured based on the US 1855 Model with the Maynard tape igniting system. For this reason, the lock features an overhang on the upper side. In time, it’s uselessness was identified and subsequently lowered to simplify the works. Except for the lock’s profile, the brass butt plate, and the stock’s nose cap, the resemblance to the US 1861 (the corresponding infantry musket of Northern troops) is striking. This musket is stocked in walnut and carries two sling swivels.

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Cook & Brother Carbine Reenactment

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Ferdinand and Francis Cook emigrated from England to New York when young, and eventually founded their mechanic company, Cook & Brother, in New Orleans, Louisiana. They began manufacturing guns following Louisiana’s secession in January 1861. The Union Navy’s bombing of New Orleans in April 1861 forced the Cook brothers to move their manufacturing operation to Athens, Georgia. Approximately just 1,000 rifles and carbines were produced in New Orleans before the move. An additional 7,000 units were produced in their new Georgia location.

All Cook & Brother guns were inspired by well-known English models, and of course have become amongst the most interesting and sought after of Confederate small arms. The Pedersoli reproduction features all of the brass fixtures, two sling swivels, and ramrod with jag slot found on the originals. The barrel is blued and the lock case-hardened. The stock is made of walnut.

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Brown Bess Full Length Reenactment

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The Brown Bess was the musket used by the English during their empire extension and consolidation in both India and America. A veteran of the Seven Years War, it was also used by Wellington during the war in the Iberian Peninsula and at Waterloo. It was used worldwide by the English, their European allies, and even by Mexican troops who carried the Brown Bess all the way through to their last battle with the US in 1847 at Chapultepec.

The lock of our reproduction carries the signature of gunsmith William Grice along with the date 1762, the crown, and the initials GR (Georgius Rex). The smooth-bore barrel is made of satin finished steel, and the stock is oil-finished walnut. Bayonet and scabbard are available.

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Harper’s Ferry Colt Conversion Reenactment

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Approximately 700,000 Model 1816 muskets were converted to percussion locks between 1848 and 1860 at both the Springfield and Harpers Ferry arsenals. The Pedersoli replica reproduces the conversion according to Samuel Colt’s system, one he used to convert many thousands of muskets from 1855 to 1858 which he purchased from the US Army stockpile held in New York. The Colt conversion used the original touch hole to screw in the drum (equipped with a transverse plug screw for cleaning) and replaced the hammer with one of unique design. Approximately 23,500 of these muskets, with rifled barrels, were shipped to Messina in August 1860 to be distributed to the “1000 followers of Garibaldi” during the famous “1000’s expedition”, but probably only half were distributed.

Our Model 1816 has satin steel furniture, and the lock is marked with HARPERS FERRY 1816, the American Eagle, and U.S. letters.

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Cook & Brother Rifle Reenactment

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Ferdinand and Francis Cook emigrated from England to New York when young, and eventually founded their mechanic company, Cook & Brother, in New Orleans, Louisiana. They began manufacturing guns following Louisiana’s secession in January 1861. The Union Navy’s bombing of New Orleans in April 1861 forced the Cook brothers to move their manufacturing operation to Athens, Georgia. Approximately just 1,000 rifles and carbines were produced in New Orleans before the move. An additional 7,000 units were produced in their new Georgia location.

All Cook & Brother guns were inspired by well-known English models, and of course have become amongst the most interesting and sought after of Confederate small arms. The Pedersoli reproduction features all of the brass fixtures, two sling swivels, and ramrod with jag slot found on the originals. The barrel is blued and the lock case-hardened. The stock is made of walnut.

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Brown Bess Carbine Reenactment

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The Brown Bess was the musket used by the English during their empire extension and consolidation in both India and America. A veteran of the Seven Years War, it was also used by Wellington during the war in the Iberian Peninsula and at Waterloo. It was used worldwide by the English, their European allies, and even by Mexican troops who carried the Brown Bess all the way through to their last battle with the US in 1847 at Chapultepec.

The lock of our reproduction carries the signature of gunsmith William Grice along with the date 1762, the crown, and the initials GR (Georgius Rex). The smooth-bore barrel is made of satin finished steel, and the stock is oil-finished walnut. Bayonet and scabbard are available.

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Springfield 1861 US Percussion Rifle

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Originally made in limited quantities by the Springfield Armory in 1861, this Pedersoli replica authentically reproduces one of the most historic firearms of American history. The 1861 was found to be more efficient than earlier muskets utilized by both sides of the American Civil War. Pedersoli produces this replica with satin finish barrel, triple banded stock, and coin finished steel furniture. The lock is polished bright and bears the US Springfield stampings.

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1816 Harper’s Ferry Reenactment

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Taking design from the famous 1777 French musket, the US 1816 musket was originally produced between 1816 and 1844 in the arsenals at both Harpers Ferry and Springfield. First produced in large quantities as flintlocks, they were later converted to percussion locks for the Civil War. The polished steel barrel is fastened to the stock via two bands, and the oil finished walnut stock bears the government “J.P.” proof mark.

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1795 Spring Field Reenactment

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Inspired by the Charleville Model 1763 musket, the 1795 was the first military arm produced in the arsenal at Springfield, Massachusetts. With many French Model 1763 parts being held in stock at Springfield for repairs, War Ministry Secretary Timothy Pickering suggested their utilization for initial production.  In all, approximately 85,000 units were produced through 1814.

This Pedersoli replica faithfully copies an original manufactured between 1799 and 1802. All furniture is made of steel and the stock is walnut.

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1763 Leger (1766) Charlevelle Reenactment

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War tactics developed during the Seven Years War identified the need for accelerated rate of fire. In response, France adopted a new, stronger, infantry musket in 1763. The new musket was found to be too heavy and was replaced again only three years later by the 1766 Model. Promoted by M. de Montbeillard, Inspector of the Manufacturer of Saint-Etienne, more than 150,000 units were produced until 1769 when it was replaced by the Model 1770/71. France distributed numerous Model 1766 muskets to troops of the newly born United States of America for use in their war for independence.

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Enfield 3 Band Pattern 1853 Rifle Musket

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Introduced by the British War Department, this Enfield was considered the apex European military gun of the time. Several studies were conducted to improve both the caliber and dimensions of previous models. However, the same general appearance of the earlier pattern 1851 was retained. Hundreds of thousands were sold to both North and South during the American Civil War, with the overwhelming majority produced by commercial gunmakers in both Birmingham and London under contract.

The Enfield features a ladder rear sight with slider, assembled on a stepped base, steel barrel bands, and brass furniture. The ramrod tip is shaped with the characteristic jag slot of the time. The gun is equipped with two sling swivels, the barrel is blued while the lock is case hardened, and the stock is made from walnut.

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Enfield 2 Band Pattern 1858 Naval Rifle

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The need to equip corps and regiments other than infantry led to the Short Rifle models. In the beginning the P1853 was simply shortened, but in time the Naval P1858 model was introduced. The barrel is held by two steel bands and is equipped with a straight rear side with slider, assembled on a stepped base. Furniture is produced from brass. The ramrod tip carries the characteristic jag slot. The Enfield 2 Band Pattern is equipped with two sling swivels and a walnut stock.

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